Publication Date

January 2003

Document Type

Article

Comments

© ACM, 2003. This is the authors’ version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in: Proceedings of the 21st Annual International Conference on Documentation. San Francisco, CA, October 12-15, 2003, 147-154.
http://doi.acm.org:80/10.1145/944868.944900

Abstract

In this paper, we introduce an analysis of the requirements and design choices for hands-free documentation. Hands-busy tasks such as cooking or car repair may require substantial interruption of the task: moving the pan off the burner and wiping hands, or crawling out from underneath the car. We review the need for hands-free documentation and explore the role of task in the use of documentation. Our central analysis examines the roles and characteristics of input and output modalities of hands-free documentation. In particular, we review the use of speech as an input modality, and then visual means and speech as possible output modalities. Finally, we discuss the implications of our analysis for the design of hands-free documentation and suggest future work. The design implications include issues of navigating through the documentation, determining the user’s task and taskstep, establishing mutual understanding of the state of the task, and determining when to start conveying information to the user.



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