Three essays on global ICT phenomenon: Productivity paradox, organizational ICT use, and privacy in social networks

Faruk Arslan, University of Texas at El Paso

Abstract

This dissertation aims to investigate the global diversity in information systems by studying three distinctive phenomena. The first essay investigates the existence of ‘IT Productivity Paradox’ within firms operating in developing countries using an empirical approach. IT Productivity Paradox has been a widely investigated topic within the context of developed countries and primarily studied within the context of developing countries using a single country. Our research addresses a gap in the literature, which is the study of IT Productivity Paradox across several developing countries with diverse characteristics. The second essay studies the contextual factors (firm characteristics and perception of external barriers) implicated with firm-level information and communication technology (ICT) use in developing countries. Unlike many studies within the literature, which investigate the firm level ICT use within a single developing country setting, our study identifies converging and diverging patterns across three developing countries with different economic magnitude and historical backgrounds. The third essay investigates the information privacy phenomenon among social network site users from 27 European Union (EU) countries. Using a research model based on multi-theory framework, we study the antecedents of information privacy concern and actual disclosure within social network site setting and identify converging and diverging patterns across the EU’s six cultural heritage regions. Given its rich multi-country sample and generalizable conclusions, this study addresses a unique gap in the information privacy literature.^

Subject Area

Information technology|Information science

Recommended Citation

Arslan, Faruk, "Three essays on global ICT phenomenon: Productivity paradox, organizational ICT use, and privacy in social networks" (2015). ETD Collection for University of Texas, El Paso. AAI10000765.
http://digitalcommons.utep.edu/dissertations/AAI10000765

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