Mouse wrist rests comparison and their relation with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) factors

Nancy I Arana, University of Texas at El Paso

Abstract

Some studies have determined that wrist rests allow the most neutral wrist posture. Currently there is a huge variety of mouse wrist rests (MWR's) on the market. However, there does not seem to be any valid studies that address a comparison between the different types of wrist rests. The objective of this study was to compare four different mouse wrist rests, chosen as a representation of the ones on the market, and try to determine which mouse wrist rests characteristics are better to avoid CTS risk factors and more comfortable based on flexion/extension and ulnar/radial deviation angles measurements, anthropometric measurements, and perceived subject's strain and discomfort. ^ A group of twenty-two Industrial Engineering Undergraduate Students (12 males and 10 females) participated in a laboratory study to compare the mouse wrist rests. The participants performed a 5 minute computerized task with each mouse wrist rest. Throughout the tests, wrist angles were measured with a twin axis electrogoniometer. ^ The wrist rest that presented lower flexion/extension mean angle was the Easy Glide Gel Filled Wrist Rest and Mouse Pad™ but was also the wrist rest with the highest mean ulnar/radial deviation angles. The one that showed the highest flexion/extension average angle is the SoftSpot Vantage Economy Mouse Pad and Wrist Rest™. The Gel Crystals Flex Rest Wrist Rest™ had the lower ulnar/radial deviation angles. ^ The Easy Glide Gel Filled Wrist Rest and Mouse Pad™ was the one with the higher scores related to strain severity; also this wrist rest was scored by the participants as the least comfortable. The most comfortable wrist rests were the Gel Crystals Flex Rest Wrist Rest™ and the SoftSpot Vantage Economy Mouse Pad and Wrist Rest™ both with the same scores. ^ Based on these results it is impossible to pinpoint exactly one wrist rest as the best because some characteristics are better to avoid radial/ulnar deviation angles and others to avoid flexion/extension angles. ^

Subject Area

Health Sciences, Occupational Health and Safety|Health Sciences, Rehabilitation and Therapy|Biology, Animal Physiology|Engineering, Industrial

Recommended Citation

Arana, Nancy I, "Mouse wrist rests comparison and their relation with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) factors" (2005). ETD Collection for University of Texas, El Paso. AAI1430223.
http://digitalcommons.utep.edu/dissertations/AAI1430223

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