Voices in the desert: Civilian and army perceptions of Indians in the Southwest, 1846--1886

Krista Bridget Stephan-Ward, University of Texas at El Paso

Abstract

This work will explore the attitudes of nineteenth-century Anglo men and women who put pen to paper and expressed opinions concerning Indians in the Southwest between the years 1846 to 1886---from the beginning of the Mexican-American War to the final surrender of the Apaches. Published memoirs, diaries and letters by civilians, army officers and their wives compose the primary source material cited in this study. Although scholars examined the views held by Anglo men and women concerning Indians, they did not attempt to critically examine the attitudes of different groups of Anglos, such as army men and their wives as opposed to settlers, in order to compare their responses. This thesis will contribute to the scholarship by exploring the ways in which these distinct groups of Anglos perceived Indians. ^

Subject Area

History, United States

Recommended Citation

Stephan-Ward, Krista Bridget, "Voices in the desert: Civilian and army perceptions of Indians in the Southwest, 1846--1886" (2006). ETD Collection for University of Texas, El Paso. AAI1435307.
http://digitalcommons.utep.edu/dissertations/AAI1435307

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