Learning and student satisfaction: Interviews on the affects of accent on student perceptions of instructors

Isaac Joseph Ortega, University of Texas at El Paso

Abstract

The classroom environment has many different components that can affect student learning and satisfaction. Instructor accent is one such variable that affects student academic success. This study reports findings of six focus group interviews in which 43 participants shared their experiences regarding instructors with accents. Cognitive dissonance theory (Festinger, 1957) was used to explain student responses in the focus groups. The findings suggest that students reported instructor accent influencing learning and satisfaction in the classroom environment. Students also reported a change in initial attitude in order to accommodate their actions both during the experience and at present time of the focus group study. Some limitations encountered during this project included sample size and not reporting participants accents. Future research should focus on cultural sensitivity classes and tolerance levels of multicultural surroundings. Researchers may find a connection between the dissonance experienced by students and their level of maturity over time.^

Subject Area

Psychology, Social|Speech Communication|Education, Educational Psychology

Recommended Citation

Ortega, Isaac Joseph, "Learning and student satisfaction: Interviews on the affects of accent on student perceptions of instructors" (2008). ETD Collection for University of Texas, El Paso. AAI1453807.
http://digitalcommons.utep.edu/dissertations/AAI1453807

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