Gottfredson and Hirschi's low self-control theory: An empirical test using Hispanic university students

Claudia Sarah Rocha, University of Texas at El Paso

Abstract

Low self-control theory posits that those with low self-control are more likely to commit criminal or analogous acts than those with high self-control. The authors of the theory, Michael Gottfredson and Travis Hirschi, also claim great generality for low self-control theory, such that the theory can explain any type of crime by any type of person. This study tests Gottfredson and Hirschi's low self-control theory's basic prediction as well as its generality claim. To this end, the theory is tested with a Hispanic sample of undergraduate students. Only until recently have a few cross-cultural studies been done to test its generality claim (see Tittle and Botchkovar 2005; Vazsonyi et al. 2001; Vazsonyi et al. 2004; Morris et al. 2007; Romero et al. 2003) and the present study follows this emerging research agenda. It then becomes interesting to see if this theory could be applicable to understanding deviance among Hispanics.^

Subject Area

Sociology, Criminology and Penology|Hispanic American Studies

Recommended Citation

Claudia Sarah Rocha, "Gottfredson and Hirschi's low self-control theory: An empirical test using Hispanic university students" (January 1, 2008). ETD Collection for University of Texas, El Paso. Paper AAI1453831.
http://digitalcommons.utep.edu/dissertations/AAI1453831

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