I'd be helping if we weren't so committed: The application of the investment model to the study of alibis

Kevin Weston Jolly, University of Texas at El Paso

Abstract

What research that has been conducted on alibis has examined how knowledge of the existance of a relationship between the accused and the alibi provider impacts juror verdicts. Rusbult (1980a) proposed that satisfaction, investment, and alternatives to the present relationship contribute to a couple's commitment. When commitment is present in the relationship between an alibi corroborator and a defedendant, alibi evaluators may believe that the alibi corroborator is motivated to fabricate the defendant's alibi, thus making the alibi less believable. The present research incorporated a between-subjects design examining how perceptions of relationship components affect the evaluation of a defendant's alibi and the motivations behind the alibi corroborator's testimony. Results suggested that when an alibi corroborator is in a highly satisfactory relationship with the defendant, she is perceived to be more motivated to lie for her boyfriend; however, no relationship was found between ratings of alibi believability and motivation to lie.^

Subject Area

Psychology, Social|Psychology, Experimental

Recommended Citation

Jolly, Kevin Weston, "I'd be helping if we weren't so committed: The application of the investment model to the study of alibis" (2008). ETD Collection for University of Texas, El Paso. AAI1453832.
http://digitalcommons.utep.edu/dissertations/AAI1453832

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