A tobacco consumption diary to assess the factors associated with smoking in a light smoking college population

Thomas J Taylor, University of Texas at El Paso

Abstract

Limited information exists about the proximal predictors of light smoking fewer than 10 cigarettes per day (cpd). Furthermore, light smokers are not highly motivated to quit smoking. This study examined predictors of light smoking and motivational change toward quitting smoking in 118 light smoking college students. Participants completed a 7 day Tobacco Consumption Diary (TCD) by recording for each cigarette: time and day, location, number of people present, number of smokers present, mood, and whether alcohol was consumed. Carbon Monoxide (CO) feedback was also provided to a random half of the participants at the outset of the study. CO feedback and self-monitoring of 7 days of smoking were examined as to their influence on motivational changes toward quitting smoking. Results indicated limited motivation change as a function of CO feedback and self-monitoring. Behaviorally, light smoking appeared to be most strongly associated with the presence of alcohol, later time of day, and a variety of locations. Light smokers appear to be cue oriented in their smoking similar to heavier smokers, though motivating light smokers to quit through health feedback and self-monitoring activities is likely not effective.^

Subject Area

Psychology, Behavioral|Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Taylor, Thomas J, "A tobacco consumption diary to assess the factors associated with smoking in a light smoking college population" (2009). ETD Collection for University of Texas, El Paso. AAI1465275.
http://digitalcommons.utep.edu/dissertations/AAI1465275

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