Low birth weight, prenatal smoking, pest exposure and breastfeeding modify the effect of acculturation on Hispanic children's asthma

Paola Chavez Payan, University of Texas at El Paso

Abstract

Prior research suggests that Hispanic migrants in the U.S. experience better respiratory health than their U.S.-born counterparts; this is reflective of a Hispanic health paradox (HHP). I address the following research questions with a focus on the HHP among children in the urban US border setting of El Paso, Texas: 1) Does acculturation relate to current asthma symptoms and diagnosed asthma? 2) Does the relationship between acculturation and current asthma symptoms and diagnosed asthma persist when controlling for relevant risk factors? 3) How does acculturation modify the relationships between the risk factors and current asthma symptoms and diagnosed asthma? Data were collected through a cross-sectional, observational mail survey of all primary caretakers of 4th and 5th graders in the El Paso Independent School District (N=1,513 Hispanic families). Generalized linear models (GLM) and interaction effects were used. Acculturation was a positive and significant predictor of asthma symptoms and diagnosed asthma. Low birth weight, prenatal smoking, pest exposure, and breastfeeding modified the effect of acculturation on asthma symptoms and diagnosed asthma. Overall the results of the research suggest that acculturation matters yet it is not equally risky for all Hispanic children. These findings foster an understanding of how the effect of acculturation on Hispanic children's respiratory health is intensified or attenuated by distinct individual-level risk factors.^

Subject Area

Sociology, Theory and Methods|Health Sciences, Public Health|Hispanic American Studies|Health Sciences, Epidemiology

Recommended Citation

Chavez Payan, Paola, "Low birth weight, prenatal smoking, pest exposure and breastfeeding modify the effect of acculturation on Hispanic children's asthma" (2013). ETD Collection for University of Texas, El Paso. AAI1551219.
http://digitalcommons.utep.edu/dissertations/AAI1551219

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