One size does not fit all looking beyond homeless housing-first and housing-ready approaches to enhanced models of the U.S.-Mexico border and New York City

Jacqueline Loweree, University of Texas at El Paso

Abstract

This study explored two "enhanced" service and housing models for homeless persons in the U.S.-Mexico border and in New York City. From data collected in both regions, this study examined the relationship between homeless recidivism and the provision of services. The results suggest that services alone have minimal impact in reducing homeless recividism. This study also reviews the relationship between homelessness and poverty. To evaluate this interconnection, a socio-historical analysis was presented reviewing the application of poverty theories from the last two centuries, to policy-driven approaches with aims to treat indigence, poverty, inequality and more contemporary homeless issues. Using the Structuration theory by Anthony Giddens (1984), which combines agency and structure to explain homelessness, this study argues that poverty occurs through a combination of both individual agency and external structures and also argues that overcoming indigence possesses the same principle. Since eliminating homelessness by only providing people their own separate apartments or houses should not be the only goal, an interview conducted with the executive director of one of the "enhanced" models explores alternate methods to mitigating homelessness. Such methods provide people who are not capable of living alone in private homes, access to housing with immediate care and oversight. From the findings, a Call to Action for policy changes and suggestions was also included.^

Subject Area

Social research|Sociology|Public policy

Recommended Citation

Loweree, Jacqueline, "One size does not fit all looking beyond homeless housing-first and housing-ready approaches to enhanced models of the U.S.-Mexico border and New York City" (2015). ETD Collection for University of Texas, El Paso. AAI1591971.
http://digitalcommons.utep.edu/dissertations/AAI1591971

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