Examining the effects of political trust, attribution of responsibility, and media framing on public support for outside intervention in the Mexican drug war

Rodrigo A Borunda, University of Texas at El Paso

Abstract

To what extent does the Mexican society support cooperation with foreign authorities to combat the drug cartels? Who does the Mexican society trust in combating the drug cartels? Employing survey data from the Roper Center along with original experimental data, I examine the determinants of public support for foreign cooperation to combat drug cartels. Focusing on different forms of the U.S.-Mexico cooperation, I explore which type and form of foreign intervention is most acceptable to the Mexican public. Specifically, I examine public support for the following forms of cooperation: training Mexican police and military personnel, providing money and weapons to the Mexican police and military, and deploying troops in Mexico. I hypothesize that the three main factors that affect the Mexican public’s support to a foreign intervention are: Mexican political trust (in the state, military, and the police), attribution of responsibility, and media framing. My empirical findings generally support my hypotheses and bear important policy implications concerning the Mexican drug war.^

Subject Area

International relations|Political science|Social structure

Recommended Citation

Borunda, Rodrigo A, "Examining the effects of political trust, attribution of responsibility, and media framing on public support for outside intervention in the Mexican drug war" (2015). ETD Collection for University of Texas, El Paso. AAI1600306.
http://digitalcommons.utep.edu/dissertations/AAI1600306

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