Does knowledge of concussion symptoms influence an athlete's self-report of history of concussion across age groups?

John Pfirman, University of Texas at El Paso

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if an athlete’s self-report of a history of concussion would increase if they are provided with information about concussions. ^ Study Design: This study used a group design pre-test information group and a post-test information group matched for age. Methods: Prior to cognitive testing, the athletes were divided into an experimental and control group. The experimental group received information about concussions before taking the cognitive test. The control group did not receive concussion information before cognitive testing. Both groups completed a questionnaire following testing that asked: “Based on your experience here today, do you think you have ever had a concussion?” ^ Results: A Chi square analysis found that the proportion of those who self-reported a history of concussion was not significantly different between those who received information and those who did not receive information prior to testing (p=0.183). An additional chi square analysis found that age of the athletes was not a factor (p=0.199). ^ Conclusions: This study concluded that information provided to an athlete about a concussion is not a significant factor in whether or not that individual self-reported a concussion. The study also found no statistically significant changes between age groups. Therefore, this study suggests there may be other factors that play a greater role in predicting self-reporting of concussions. ^

Subject Area

Speech therapy

Recommended Citation

Pfirman, John, "Does knowledge of concussion symptoms influence an athlete's self-report of history of concussion across age groups?" (2015). ETD Collection for University of Texas, El Paso. AAI1600339.
http://digitalcommons.utep.edu/dissertations/AAI1600339

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