Computer use between high minority enrollment public schools and low minority enrollment public schools

Jesus Manuel Juarez, University of Texas at El Paso

Abstract

Instructional use of technology in the past decade has grown at a rapid rate in public schools. Despite this rapid spread, students are hampered by inequitable access to computers. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of technology usage in public schools having high minority student enrollment and in public schools having low minority student enrollment. Nine research questions regarding the use of computers to read, write, and spell, to learn math, to learn social studies concepts, to learn science concepts, to learn keyboarding skills, to create art, to compose music and/or perform music, for enjoyment (games), and to access information (Internet/LAN) were addressed. Data were analyzed by conducting a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) using percent minority, location, and region as the independent variables and the nine research questions as the dependent variables. Results of the MANOVA were statistical differences among percent minority, percent minority and region, and percent minority, region, and location. Three statistical differences were reported for percent minority, region, and location in computer use to read, write, and spell, to learn math, and for science concepts. Three subject areas had the highest frequency of computer use: to read, write, and spell, to learn math, and for fun (games). The frequency of use for these three subjects areas was computer use once or twice a week. The lowest areas were computer use for social studies concepts, to compose music, and for Internet/LAN. The frequency of use for these three subjects was never or once a month or less. ^ Computer use to read, write, and spell had the highest frequency among schools having 50% or more minority student enrollment, but less than 75% minority students in the Northeast, whereas the West, regardless of percent minority and the Midwest followed in computer use frequency. The lowest frequency of computer use was found among schools having 50% or more, but less than 75% minority students in the South. ^ Computer use to learn math had the highest frequency among schools in the West, regardless of percent minority students, whereas the Midwest, regardless of percent minority, and the Northeast followed in computer use frequency. The lowest frequency of computer use was found among schools having 50% or more, but less than 75% minority students in the South. ^ Computer use for science concepts had the highest frequency among schools in the West and Midwest, regardless of percent minority population. The lowest frequency of computer use was found among schools having 75% or more minority students in the Northeast and in schools having 50% or more, but less than 75% minority students in the South. ^ The lowest frequency of computer use was found in the South in central cities. Specifically, schools in Southern central cities having a minority population of 50% or more but less than 75% had the lowest frequency (computer use not ascertained or never) for all subject areas. ^

Subject Area

Education, Administration|Education, Technology of

Recommended Citation

Juarez, Jesus Manuel, "Computer use between high minority enrollment public schools and low minority enrollment public schools" (2002). ETD Collection for University of Texas, El Paso. AAI3049700.
http://digitalcommons.utep.edu/dissertations/AAI3049700

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