Processing facial similarity: Utilizing denotative and connotative information to understand facial similarity judgments

Stephen James Ross, University of Texas at El Paso

Abstract

While much research has examined the processes through which individuals encode and recognize faces, our understanding of the processes that are used when judging the similarity of two faces is less developed. The present research was designed to deepen our understanding of how individuals process similarity between two faces. Specifically, these studies set out to identify (a) whether similarity judgments were a result of intuitive or deliberative processing, (b) the types of information that were important for evaluating facial similarity, and (c) how individuals use that information when formulating their decisions. Results of these studies indicated that similarity judgments are a likely to be a product of intuitive processing. In addition, facial similarity is determined through evaluations of featural similarity and inferred attributional information relating to personological and global characteristics of the individuals being evaluated. Four non-exclusive decision strategies were discovered. Directions for future research and the implications of these results for applied research examining eyewitness identification procedures are discussed.^

Subject Area

Psychology, Cognitive

Recommended Citation

Ross, Stephen James, "Processing facial similarity: Utilizing denotative and connotative information to understand facial similarity judgments" (2008). ETD Collection for University of Texas, El Paso. AAI3310674.
http://digitalcommons.utep.edu/dissertations/AAI3310674

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