Coordination amphiphiles: Post-secondary self-assembly as a new strategy for the synthesis of complex nanostructures

Itzia Zoraida Cruz-Campa, University of Texas at El Paso

Abstract

The use of coordination-directed self-assembly has become an area of intense research for the synthesis of discrete and extended nanostructures. It uses non-covalent interactions as the synthetic vectors that guide molecules into secondary superstructures. We have developed a new approach that combines metal-ligand coordination interactions, hydrogen bonding, and the properties that amphiphiles exhibit in water to create molecular units that self-assemble into intricate nanostructures with dimensions between 40–500 nm. For example, we prepared homogenous dispersions of ∼50 nm liposomes that comprise coordination Cu(II) complexes on their surface. We demonstrated that these nanospheres have the ability to encapsulate hydrophobic molecules such as plumbagin and transport them to cervical cancer cells of HeLa-GFP. By changing the coordination geometry of the copper center, it is possible to create a dinuclear Cu-complex amphiphile which self-assembly in water to form liposomes of ∼65 nm. As a result of increasing the hydrophobic component of these amphiphiles, we were able to form lamellar structures that are 2.5 nm in depth and extend in an area of 500 nm x 500 nm. ^

Subject Area

Chemistry, Physical

Recommended Citation

Cruz-Campa, Itzia Zoraida, "Coordination amphiphiles: Post-secondary self-assembly as a new strategy for the synthesis of complex nanostructures" (2004). ETD Collection for University of Texas, El Paso. AAIEP10778.
http://digitalcommons.utep.edu/dissertations/AAIEP10778

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